A Short Message Makes a Difference

by Warren

The Postman sends a messageI just finished watching The Postman, a post-apocalyptic film based on the novel by David Brin.

I won’t say much about the film.. movie reviews abound for this type of Costner saga and frankly, they are not usually my first choice

What did strike me was the central theme of the film… In a screwed up world, people get hope from the simpliest of messages.. a found letter from a long lost relative or a few words from a man with a mission. I suppose Kevin Costner is somewhat like The Postman.. I’m told he gets a vision for a project and never lets go, inspiration to us all to keep at it and share our gifts.

Just a couple of years ago, I might have dismissed this as nothing more than theatrical license. Today, I know what happens when I listen to my online network and feedback a very short message of hope and love. Sometimes this message rings out louder than any bullhorn or 50,000 watt transmitter and touches the hearts of someone.

We really don’t know what all is going on in the life of those we come in contact with. Out of the thousands that see my tweets on Twitter there are bound to be a few that resonate with just about anything I say. Once they reply, it only takes a moment to acknowledge them and who knows.. maybe make their day. :)

For me, this started on Twitter. Like everyone, I wondered if it was going to take too much time.. fortunately I had the excuse of counting some of it a research for my book.. but the more I got to think of it, I knew I had to make it my goal to answer every tweet that was directed to me.

Doing this with the idea that each tweet reply was addressing at least one real human being that had connected to me soon wasn’t a chore, it became a passion. Further it actually improved my connections off Twitter as well. I find I write more from the heart, have an easier time getting past the “empty paper” stage of starting a project and always have a lot more fun.

When a dark day occurs, I think of the the lives changed when one person stops to smile or share a kind word, rededicate myself to giving more and look for a few tweets in the stream where I can add value to the conversation.

Do you have a story of a short message, tweet, text or idea that changed your world? Please share in the comments.

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Barbara Schiffman November 11, 2009 at 4:22 am

Thank you, Warren, for your post today — it struck a loud chord with me. I’m a script consultant to major Hollywood producers and read lots of books to evaluate if/how they can get made into movies. Sometimes the theme of the book can translate well to the film (and sometimes not…).

I like that “The Postman” is a metaphor for you about touching the lives of others with any action you take — even “just” a smile or a kind word. This idea has been very personal to me ever since I had a similar idea last year that, no matter what I’m doing — reading books or scripts, consulting with producers or writers, coaching writer or other clients or groups — my REAL job in life is to be a Joy Spreader. My cosmic job description is to spread whatever joy I can feel even when things may not be great through sharing a smile or kind word even to people I will never see or talk to again.

Taking this job seriously has made me pay more attention to the people who pass through my day — especially in elevators or service people I interact with by phone. It shifts my focus from myself to them and connects me with the world. Every little bit of joy or good energy resonates with everyone it touches and on out to those they touch as well.

I love the way smiling at someone or saying something nice (even over the phone) can easily brighten up their day as well as mine. Your post has inspired me to rededicate myself to finding even more opportunities — online or offline — to add value to people’s lives. Doing so always adds value to mine!

Barbara Schiffman

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Warren Whitlock November 11, 2009 at 6:37 am

Barbara

Your short message made a difference in my day. Thank you.

We all can be like that guy in the Validation Movie.

Warren

Reply

Barbara Schiffman November 10, 2009 at 8:22 pm

Thank you, Warren, for your post today — it struck a loud chord with me. I’m a script consultant to major Hollywood producers and read lots of books to evaluate if/how they can get made into movies. Sometimes the theme of the book can translate well to the film (and sometimes not…).

I like that “The Postman” is a metaphor for you about touching the lives of others with any action you take — even “just” a smile or a kind word. This idea has been very personal to me ever since I had a similar idea last year that, no matter what I’m doing — reading books or scripts, consulting with producers or writers, coaching writer or other clients or groups — my REAL job in life is to be a Joy Spreader. My cosmic job description is to spread whatever joy I can feel even when things may not be great through sharing a smile or kind word even to people I will never see or talk to again.

Taking this job seriously has made me pay more attention to the people who pass through my day — especially in elevators or service people I interact with by phone. It shifts my focus from myself to them and connects me with the world. Every little bit of joy or good energy resonates with everyone it touches and on out to those they touch as well.

I love the way smiling at someone or saying something nice (even over the phone) can easily brighten up their day as well as mine. Your post has inspired me to rededicate myself to finding even more opportunities — online or offline — to add value to people’s lives. Doing so always adds value to mine!

Barbara Schiffman

Reply

Warren Whitlock November 10, 2009 at 10:37 pm

Barbara

Your short message made a difference in my day. Thank you.

We all can be like that guy in the Validation Movie.

Warren

Reply

Lorne Pike November 18, 2010 at 2:15 am

Great post, Warren. Of all places, to leave a long comment, this would be the worst! :) So I’ll keep this brief. But I do agree entirely. We often have no idea of the impact we have on others through just a strategically placed sentence or two. Thanks for the reminder!

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